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Selecting an Early Notification (EN) Provider

Posted by on 6 May 2014

There are only three approved EN providers in New Zealand and they all conform to the protocol established by the Ministry of Education in 2006.

This protocol sets out the rules of engagement between your Student Management system and the EN Provider. Despite this, not all EN providers are the same or offer the same services and features.

These are things to look for when choosing an Early Notification provider:

  • Complete integration with your Student Management System. Messages go out and replies are received in, allowing efficient management of unexplained absences
  • The ability to readily set and edit your outgoing message wording
  • The ability to view EN batches (sent messages and replies) outside of the Student Management System via an Internet connection, allowing school management to track progress remotely without needing access to the Student Management System
  • The ability to view archived batched going back more than two weeks
  • The ability to search and report on notification responses relating to a specific student
  • Training specific to the Student Management System and the education sector
  • Support that is knowledgeable of the different Student Management Systems and how their Attendance Management systems work
  • Both ongoing costs and the ease and expense of support. Does the EN provider have a 0800 support phone number? Do they provide EN training? At what cost?

 

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Avoid being flooded with calls during a natural disaster

Posted by Andrew Balfour on 7 March 2014 - Tags , ,

Beckenham School flood

Beckenham School was closed on Wednesday, 5th March, due to heavy flooding

Christchurch schools have yet again been reminded of the importance of having a communication plan in place for emergencies and natural disasters. Last Wednesday many Christchurch children awoke to see their neighbourhood flooded as a result of excess rain in the region. Upon seeing their street turned into a river many had just one hopeful question for mum and dad - will school be closed?!

Cantabrian schools staff were given the task of notifying parents of whether the school was closed or not in a timely, efficient manner. This would have been impossible to achieve without a dependable communication plan to put into action and as a result their phone systems would have also been flooded – with parents ringing to find out about school closures.

Make sure your communication plan has the following features:

Remote access

Having remote access to a contacts list database will allow staff to access contact details immediately, wherever they may be. The easiest way to do this is by having your database accessible online. This way you don’t need to send anyone in to the school to send out a message – you just have to be somewhere with access to the internet.

The ability to send one mass message

An efficient way to notify parents of your school’s closure is to send out one mass notification message to a whole database. Sending an e-mail or text message, rather than having to ring each parent, will save a lot of time and resources.

Delivery reports

Delivery reports are confirmations that show when each parent receives the text or e-mail. This will notify school staff of any parent who hasn’t received the message and alert them to take action to contact them by another communication channel.

Parents know the school will contact them

Constantly remind parents that in the event of a school closure, the school will notify them. If parents do not know that they will be contacted by you, many will attempt to ring the school to find out what is happening resulting in the school phone system being inundated with calls and extra stress put on administration staff.

  

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Growing parent engagement

Posted by Andrew Balfour on 18 December 2013 - Tags , ,

Over the last few years, technology has given us the ability and tools to communicate with each other more easily and in a multitude of different ways. This has allowed schools to go from having a paper newsletter that gets delivered once a week via the bottom of a school bag (more or less crumpled), to regular emails and text messages.

However this shift in communication is also driving increased demand from parents who want to find out more about, not only what is happening at the school, but also how their child is doing in the classroom. While this may take a bit more precious time of the teachers and staff, providing parents with this information can create a strong and effective partnership between all parties.

To help make this process easier and more efficient, the school needs to create a strategy to help build a stronger relationship between parents and teachers to leverage the combined power of the two which will lead to greater and more positive outcomes for students.

Here are some tips that your school can utilise to improve communications with parents.

Set your goals

Create a conversation to let everyone know what the goals will be for the classroom. Do you want better student attendance? Do you want active and evident parent engagement with homework or class projects their child is involved in? Whatever your goals are, keep them in mind when designing your plan.

Demand high expectations

Research has shown that parental expectations are one of the strongest predictors of student achievement. Your parent engagement plan should set clear, consistent, achievable and high expectations for student performance in class and with the school.

Bringing parents into this will help shift some of the burden and will enable them to reinforce your expectations in the home.

Find out the best way to communicate

It’s a good idea to ask parents what communication methods are best for them – ideally at the start of the year but also at regular intervals during the year. Do not assume that parents are all the same. Find out the best method that works for them.

While email may be great for some parents and is a very cost effective way of communicating, you can also try texting, or other online options like Twitter and Facebook. Some traditional options, like notes and calls home, can be time intensive, but still work for some parents.

Notice and measure what’s happening

Pay attention to your results. Are your communications getting parents engaged? Are unexplained absences reducing? Are parent/teacher attendance rates increasing? Are there fewer complaints about unknown cancelled sports practices or school closures? Are permission slips being returned? Do students arrive prepared for class? What methods are providing the most response from parents and students? You can adapt your plan to make the best use of your time. If most parents respond best to email, then you can save yourself some calls home, and so on.

Don’t let communications and parent engagement be just a checklist; turn it into a strategy for achieving your larger school and classroom goals. Open up the lines of communications with parents, and set them up to be more involved with their children and get them to talk with their kids each day about their school day. Leverage the power of the home as well as the school to get the most out of your students.

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